interior designer

The Design Development Phase

Ya’ll. October was crazy. How in the heck do other people keep up with blogging every week. Nay, a few times a week?! My apologies. I hope to do better from now through the end of the year. Here’s my next story based on the design process at Midnight Midcentury.

Photo by Courtney Paige Ray

Photo by Courtney Paige Ray

Design Development is the next phase in the process of working with a Design Professional. In case you missed the first steps, you can read it here before you read this story.

So now you’ve settled on a design concept and floor plan. Great! Time to sign off on Phase 1 and move into Phase 2. You Design Professional will have you officially approve of your selected concept and floor plan, then bill you for the end of Phase 1, per your signed agreement.

The Design Development Phase is when your project begins to come to life. Your Design Professional will begin sourcing furniture and finishes as well as designing and drawing cabinetry or any other custom built items. If you are knocking down any walls or moving things around (like kitchens and bathrooms) those drawings will be made as well.

I like to provide little mock ups for my clients so they can visualize various options as they come together. Here are three different mock-ups I put together for Midnight Midcentury

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These provided a lot of great feedback from the client in that they told me the things that they definitely wanted and other things that they would like to see more options for. Having a variety allows the client to more specifically describe what they do and don’t like about certain things. In this case, it was that they wanted fully upholstered lounge chairs and the dark blue wall with grey sofa. This client was also pretty certain about rug, chandelier, and table dining table options, so that set up on the path to be able to view these items in person prior to purchasing. The overall concept is there, and now it comes down to keying in on the specific pieces that are desired.

When I’m working on remodel and cabinetry work (which, being an architect and interior designer, is pretty much a given) I work through drawings which are super important. Once fully developed, the drawings become what is given to the contractor or millworker as the design to build from. I also use them as a way to show little vignettes to my clients to help them better visualize what their cabinet, fireplace, etc could look like.

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This phase doesn’t have just one meeting, it’s a lot of back and forth and parting of the different design elements until the client is happy with each individual item. This phase generally takes the longest of any design phase.

Wednesday Round-Up: Go-To Pendants

I love a good, simple pendant. I think pendants are great over breakfast tables, kitchen islands, and powder rooms (the cedar and moss below is what I sourced for Midnight Midcentury. shhhh) And the west elm pendant shown here? It’s in my living room!

pendants for any room in the home

Wednesday Round -Up: Soft Statement Chairs

Just popping in really quickly to show you some statement lounge seating that I’m currently loving. These all have that that fat, soft look to them. Which one is your favorite?

statement chairs, modern, designed, style, soft, furniture, interior design

It's all about the Algorithm

I understand many people’s frustration with instagram, I’ve been there. But if you are an architect or interior designer, there are certain things you should be doing to engage and increase your following as well as get your business out there. As I’ve been slowly growing my following and upping my instagram game over the past few years, I’ve learned a few tips that I’d love to share in hopes that any other great architects and interior designers out there don’t give up hope from instagram.

Make sure your grid is not haphazard

You’ve seen all those beautifully curated grids and wondered how those people are so good at getting the perfect content put together in such an elegant way. I’m here to let you know that many of those brands have someone else managing their accounts. If you have the dough to swing that - do it. But if like me, you don’t, don’t worry. One thing I have found that is helpful is laying out your grid in diamonds. What I mean is that every other image should be similar in aesthetic and color tones. Here is mine as an example - which is by no means perfect, but illustrates what I’m talking about. This idea of curated visual cohesiveness may seem obvious as we are in a visual industry, but don’t think that it happens so easily for every instagram account out there that looks great. It takes planning, collecting great images, and time.

 
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Plan your posts with a planning tool

There are many instagram planning tools on the market, but I use Planoly. It has a free version, which I used for a little while before switching to the paid annual subscription. I try to plan out at least two weeks worth of posts. Sometimes I have the images planned and don’t add the caption until a day or two before - or if I’m slacking, the morning of. But this tool is critical to my ability to post good content daily that my audience wants to see. I like to use it as a research tool to peruse the design and architecture blogs for inspiration. Then when I see something I love, I add it to my planoly and worry about curating the grid later - that’s the great thing about it, you can constantly move around the images and update the captions up until the moment that it’s posted. Planoly also lets you categorize and save your hashtags and even has a scheduling feature if you don’t physically like posting.

Stock photos can be your friend

If you are just getting started out and don’t have a ton of your own work to show - use stock images! I had no idea half of the people I follow were using stock images to fluff up their grids and I’ve only recently started doing this. I still aim to have inspiration images and my own images more often than not - but sometimes it calls for a really beautiful stock image. It’s ok. As long as the images you use are on brand and you write a good caption, put them in there. I recommend using Unsplash which is free and you can choose whether or not you credit the photographer - it’s not required! Plus, the images are so so good.

#Hashtags

Use hashtags that your ideal clients follow. I’d recommend starting here as well as looking at the people you want engage with and seeing what hashtags they are gravitating toward. You are allowed a maximum of 30 hashtags per post. There is much debate about whether it’s best to put the hashtags in the comments or on the caption. I do it on the caption, I’ve heard both options argued - bottom line is to use good hashtags and don’t overthink it as that can hold you up from performing in the first place!

Enjoy what you are putting out there

If you don’t enjoy it and you feel down on yourself, your audience will realize it. Even though I post every day, I do it because I want to. As long as you are consistent, you can do 3-4 times a week. Just make sure to stay engaged with your followers and your community and you should see your following grow.


If any designers or architects are getting their work from instagram - I’d love to hear from you! Shoot me an email at Taryn (at) bcstudiola.com. Thanks!

#GimmeThatDesign, Installment 1

Welcome to the first of a new series. #GimmeThatDesign is meant to be fun and educational. In this series, I will use an image of a beautiful space that I love and I will source furniture and materials to give you that design for yourself.

I would love to hear from you. If you have a design that you would like featured in the series, send the image along with the designer and photographer, as well as where you found the design to Taryn (at) bcstudiola.com

Get the look from Fabrio Fantolin designed apartments in Turin, Italy as featured in this article on Dezeen.

photo by Giorgio Possenti and styling by Tom Design

photo by Giorgio Possenti and styling by Tom Design

Gimmee that Design Interior Design

Various Shades of Grey

I have had a grey obsession for many years now. In architecture school, you learn that architects all wear black. While this is probably 90% true, and I definitely own key black architectural attire, I often dress in all grey. Additionally, my house is about 90% grey, hence the instagram photo that may have led you to this post. But I recognize that I am not alone in this grey obsession. Researching a variety of interiors these days, the color grey is abound, and it looks fabulous! Whereas many buildings have long been grey, thanks to concrete, limestone, and steel being key exterior architectural materials.

The thing about grey as an interior design element is that you can use just about any color as an accent and it will be perfect every time! That's why I am a huge advocate for selecting grey major pieces, such as sofas, chairs, even rugs. Then whenever you need a style change, you can change out pillows, arts, and accessories as you wish. Of course, in my own home, my pillows and accessories are all mostly grey too. But, hey, I already let you know that I'm obsessed!

I should also point out that yes, I spell it with an "e" GREY... Most Americans spell it GRAY. I think it's much prettier with the "e," and I feel that it makes it that much more mine.

Here's my round up of some stunning greys that I think are doing a great job at doing what they do:

1. A dark grey wall helps makes the white art, linens, and Louis Poulsen lamp pop.

source unknown

source unknown

2. Color blocks of grey. A definite favorite of mine, just like I did in one of my favorite interior projects, LA Home Office. And yes to West Elm's Saddle Swivel Chair.

source unknown

source unknown

3. A medium-light grey linen sofa will never go out of style. How awesome is that large scale ombre art?

Interior Addict, via Instagram

Interior Addict, via Instagram

4. A lovely grey, muted bathroom is the perfect place to relax in the tub/shower after a long, hard workout.

Lubelso Hawthorne Home by Canny, via designmilk

Lubelso Hawthorne Home by Canny, via designmilk

5. An all exposed concrete building is more than alright with me. It's one of my favorite things!

Bundner Kunst Museum by Barozzi Veiga, via Dezeen

Bundner Kunst Museum by Barozzi Veiga, via Dezeen